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Meet our Intern - Kristyn Stoia

We have a new member of the Skylark Team:

Kristyn Stoia is currently a Freshman at Boston College majoring in English and is also pursuing the Pre-Law track. Outside of academics, she can usually be found at the barn riding for the Equestrian Team, or in the stands during athletic games playing for the BC Band. Kristyn has a keen interest in Law and is looking forward to her first experience in the legal profession.

During her time at Skylark, Kristyn will be working on making the website more accessible for clients and visitors alike. Modifications will be made to make the website better accessible for those who are visually impaired, hearing impaired, and any other impairments that can limit access to our resources. The user experience for every individual who visits our website is a major aspect of our ethos, so making the appropriate adjustments to our website is an endeavor that we’re looking forward to accomplishing.

The inspiration to undertake this project initially game from Haben Girma, who is a disability rights lawyer and advocate and was the very first deaf-blind graduate of Harvard Law. She travels the world sharing her message of equal accessibility for everyone.  Haben addresses the importance of the user experience for individuals of all different capability levels. After having the pleasure of hearing her speak at a conference in New Orleans, we were influenced to take on an accessibility project of our own in the pursuit of making our legal services and our online resources more accessible for everyone.

We’re eager to hear what we can do to make the website more accessible for each and every person. Please don’t hesitate to contact us with suggestions of how we can accomplish accessibility for your individual needs.

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