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Showing posts from August, 2009

What is the Stevenson-Kelsey Spousal Support Calculator?

UPDATE: There is pending legislation for major changes to the alimony statute in Massachusetts. The Alimony Reform Act of 2011 was filed on January 18, 2011 and you can learn more about the Act at MassAlimonyFormula.com or in our recent blog post highlighting the differences between the bill and the current law . Attorney Scott R. Stevenson of Hingham, Massachusetts and Attorney Justin L. Kelsey, Esq. (one of the authors of this blog) created the Stevenson-Kelsey Spousal Support Calculator as a tool to enable family law practitioners to better advise their clients regarding the settlement of divorce cases where a primary issue is the proposed alimony payment from one spouse to the other. There is not currently any “formula” for the calculation of the spousal support obligation (also referred to as “alimony”) that is endorsed by either the Massachusetts Legislature, a consensus of Massachusetts Probate and Family Court Justices, or even a consensus of Massachusetts family law practi

Check out these fun sites:

It's time for a lighter, more fun blog post. Check out these sites/stories which we hope will add a little amusement to your day: Husband who tries to avoid divorce proceedings by claiming the marriage ended when he died. Yes you read that correctly. Canadians are trying to kill us with health care reform. Don't worry it's tongue in cheek, and very very funny. Take a virtual tour of the Kelsey & Trask, P.C. offices in Natick. Now you'll know your way around when you come to visit.

Mediation, Collaborative Law or Litigation: What's your Vote?

One of the first things I explain to clients in our initial one hour divorce consultation is that there are three types of professionals in Massachusetts who can help clients resolve their divorce case: Mediators, Lawyers trained in Collaborative Law, and traditional Litigators. Each of these methods has strengths and weaknesses, and they can be demonstrated by showing you how some well known couples might have experienced these various options: Couple #1 - The Cleavers. Ward is a businessman and June is a stay-at-home mom. They have two children Wally and Beaver. Ward handles all of the finances and June handles most of the home care including parenting, although once in a while Ward is needed to help discipline the children (in a very stern but fair kind of way). Couple #2 - The Huxtables. Cliff is a doctor and Claire is a lawyer. They have five children. They both share in parenting and managing the finances. Cliff's office is located in the home. Couple #3 - The H

Equitable Division: This isn't Judge Solomon's Court

I was recently directed to two articles involving Husbands, one in Germany , and another in Cambodia , that, as part of their divorce, took their half of their marital homes, literally. Not by selling and getting their share of the equity, and not by buying their Wife out of her share, they literally cut the house in half. Don't get any ideas if you're getting divorced in Massachusetts, though. In Massachusetts the Court is directed by M.G.L. c. 208 § 34 to divide the assets of the parties and award support based on numerous factors including the length of the marriage, health of the parties, age of the parties, income of the parties, opportunity for future acquisition of assets and income, and more. When considering all of these factors, we often discover that an equal division of the assets, i.e. a 50/50 division, is the equitable and fair resolution. However, there are also cases where the totality of the circumstances require an unequal division. You won't find Ju