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Showing posts from June, 2010

Waiting in line for the new iPhone? There's no wait (and no cost) to download our Apps!

Today, June 24, 2010, the day of the iPhone 4.0 release, many, many Apple devotees are waiting in line, no doubt playing games, checking e-mail and surfing the web on their 3GS until they get their hands on the newest iPhone. Well, whether or not you've braved the lines to be the first to have the new device, you can still download the Kelsey & Trask, P.C. Web-Apps and iPhone Apps. (see the end of this post for instructions on how to access these apps on other smartphones as well) iPhone Apps: The Child Support Calculator App Use this worksheet to calculate the presumptive amount of child support to be ordered by the Probate & Family Courts in Massachusetts based on the Massachusetts Child Support Guidelines (including all of the calculations required for filling out the court form). You can then save your calculations, and even e-mail them. Must have app for Family Law Attys - ★★★★★ Review by Mass Attorney Must have app. Quickly calculate child support accordin

Is No-Fault Divorce a Good Thing? It may soon be the law in all 50 states.

According to a New York Times article , the New York State legislature recently approved legislation that would allow No-Fault divorces in New York. The state of New York is the last state that still requires one spouse to have committed a wrong (or at least to take the blame) for the dissolution of a marriage. Many, including the Roman Catholic Church, oppose the change because they believe it will raise the divorce rates in New York. Interestingly, the divorce rates in New York, though low compared to all 50 states (ranking 33rd), are still higher than a state like Massachusetts where No-Fault Divorce has been the law for more than thirty years (3.4 per 1000 people per year in New York vs. 2.5 per 1000 people per year in Massachusetts according to StateMaster.com ). If No-Fault divorce doesn't cause a rise in divorce rates, then what is the impact? According to a New York Times op-ed column , there are potential advantages a. The advantages include an 8-16% reduction in w

What do Divorce and the World Cup have in common?

The answer is Goals! But not the goals you're thinking of. I heard an interesting theory on why the United States will never compete with the top soccer teams in the world on ESPN Radio's The Herd with Colin Cowherd . Colin's theory is that kids in the U.S. have too many other options. The best athletes in the U.S., for the most part, grow up to play football or basketball or baseball. In contrast, the best athletes in other countries all grow up to play soccer. The United States is an underdog in the World Cup because our best athletes don't play soccer (no offense to Landon Donovan but he's no Lebron James). What does this have to with Divorce? Well, life is all about priorities and goals. U.S. athletics, parents, and children have not made soccer a priority and so, not surprisingly, we are not as competitive as countries where soccer is king. A Divorce is also all about goals as well. The things that you choose to focus on and make the most important

Access to Justice: New Procedures in Probate & Family Court

On March 15, 2010, the Chief Justice of the Probate & Family Court released uniform Probate and Family Court Scheduling Practices and Procedures . These procedures include certain requirements intended to promote predictability and uniformity of practice for the scheduling of all types of hearings in the Probate and Family Courts throughout the Commonwealth. The practices include mandatory scheduling of a next event and other requirements intended to keep cases moving forward. One of the changes is to the Motion scheduling practice. Although some courts, such as Plymouth Probate & Family Court, previously allowed for scheduling of Motions at the discretion of the litigants (within the Notice rules ), other courts, such as Norfolk, Middlesex and Suffolk Counties, only allowed for scheduling of Motions by the rules of their individual trial departments. According to the Chief Justice's new procedures: "There shall be no restrictions on the number or timing of motio