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3 Amazing Facts about the DOR Child Support Enforcement Division

In Massachusetts the Department of Revenue Child Support Enforcement Division (DOR:CSE) provides child support collection services to both payors and recipients of child support.  Three attorneys from DOR:CSE recently spoke at a Boston Bar Association Family Law Section Brown Bag presentation and shared the following amazing facts:

In 2014 the Massachusetts DOR:CSE collected 
over $646 million dollars in child support.  


DOR:CSE can collect child support in any case where the child support figure is a sum certain and the recipient requests services.  They deduct support directly from the payor's paycheck which reduces the administrative burden of payment on both the payor and recipient.  They also track any arrears which can assist parties in keeping a clear record of child support owed.



Each case at DOR:CSE has an individually assigned case worker 
and each case worker has between 1200 and 1900 cases.  


DOR:CSE has a comprehensive website that can provide a lot of information generally about there services and specifically to a recipient or payor about their account.  They also have a customer service line (1-800-332-2733) that can answer many of the basic questions that you may have.  If you have a more complicated question about your case, you should contact your case worker directly.


Despite the number of cases, DOR:CSE case workers are 
required to respond to all inquiries within 72 hours.


Case workers can be extremely helpful in addressing any issues with your specific child support case.  DOR:CSE can assist with reviewing support orders for consistency with the current child support guidelines and help with asking the court to modify the amount of the child support if necessary.  The can also assist with collection and enforcement remedies, such as bank levies, tax refund intercepts and credit reporting, to collect overdue support.


Click here if you want more information about the services available from DOR:CSE (and the services that are NOT available).

If you have a DOR:CSE hearing and need further assistance click here for more information.

Finally, if you found this information helpful, check out this site for upcoming programs from the BBA Family Law Section, including our next program on October 6:  How to Effectively Utilize the Various Settlement Processes Offered by the Court.


Comments

  1. It is super crazy to consider that these child support enforcement people have between 1200 and 1900 cases at any given time. On top of all those cases, they have a mandate of contacting clientele within seventy-two hours. That is less than a week between contacting every single client. That sure is a lot of telephone time.
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