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Divorce and Renewal Spa BootCamp Weekend for Women

Once in a while we post events on this blog that are organized by other professionals whom we respect. 

Below you will find information on a spa weekend for divorcing women, organized by Family Law Attorney Paula H. Noe, and Psychotherapist and Divorce Coach Betsy Ross. It sounds interesting but it leaves me wondering if I can successfully convince my wife that I need to organize a Golf Weekend for Divorcing Men.

Even if that never happens, there certainly is some value to finding alternative ways to help both men and women find healthy ways to deal with the stress of divorce and learn how best to manage that stress in the future.  To that end here is the invitation forwarded by Betsy Ross for their program:



DIVORCE AND RENEWAL SPA BOOTCAMP WEEKEND FOR WOMEN April 21-22, 2012
Norwich Inn and Spa
Norwich, CT
See DivorceAndRenewal.com

The weekend will provide an opportunity for women who are



RECOVERING FROM DIVORCE
or
STRUGGLING THROUGH DIVORCE
or
THINKING ABOUT DIVORCE


to spend a weekend of renewing themselves, jumpstarting the rest of their lives and creating a community. We have brought a team of highly skilled divorce professionals to help us teach skill and tactics in 2 days of stimulating and creative workshops.


Paula and I will be co-teaching and co-facilitating many of these workhops, including:

  • "Communication Tools and Tips: How to Get What You Want With Words!" 
  • "How to Talk Divorce with Your Children, Your Attorney, Your Community" 
  • "Artful and Successful Negotiation: Can I Win It?" 
  • "Anger-Weapon or Tool: How can I use it?"
  • "Preserving my family" (includes: "Who gets to keep our friends?") 
  • "Stress and String Beans: Time Management and Organizational Skills" 
  • "How do I re-launch and re-enter: personal marketing and relationship skills" (includes "Common Obstacles to Close Relationships") 

and even -


  • "Online Dating: How do I?", (includes: "The Art of Finding Someone New") 
  • "Allowing Happiness" 

and we are lucky enough to have put together a panel of divorce professionals who will speak on our lunch panel and then participate in in-depth workshops:


  • "Financial Tips and Traps for the Unmarried Woman", facilitated by Susan Miller of Aurora Financial, Wellesley, MA. 
  • "Increasing Your Parenting IQ: Co-parenting before, during and after divorce", facilitated by Judith Farris Bowman, Esquire, of Bowman, Moos and Elder, Cambridge, MA. 
  • "War Stories From the Bench: A Divorce Judge's View of Good and Bad", facilitated by Chouteau Merrill Levine, Retired Probate and Family Court Judge, Suffolk County, MA, currently of Levine Dispute Resolution of Westwood and Northhampton, MA. 

So please help us get our message out - do you know anyone who would benefit?

Click here to see the brochure - Divorce_and_Renewal_Better_Q.pdf


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