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Tuesday, October 12, 2010

Are there any provisions of a Separation Agreement then must Merge?

For an explanation of the difference between merger and survival of Separation Agreement provisions read our past post on this question.

There are two types of provisions that cannot survive a Judgment of Divorce but must be merged. These are provisions relating to child custody/visitation and child support.

The Court retains jurisdiction over provisions relating to child custody/visitation to protect the children. For example, in the event one party becomes unfit to parent the children it would be detrimental to the children to have that provision survive and be unchangeable. Although there is another method by which a parent can give up their parental rights permanently (through a Waiver of Parental Rights), there is not any way that a party can guarantee they will keep their rights forever. The right to be custodial parent will always be subject to your continued fitness to parent your children.

Although typically paid to the custodial parent, child support is also for the benefit of the child, not the parent. Therefore, you cannot give away your child's right to seek greater child support if there is a material and significant change in circumstances. Accordingly, the court requires that child support provisions merge as well.

These are the only two types of provisions that must be merged in any case involving children. There may be other provisions, however, that in certain circumstances the Court may require you to merge. One example of this is in very long-term marriages (such as a 30 year marriage or longer), the Court may refuse to allow parties to survive a waiver of alimony. Some Judges have expressed the opinion that it is not fair and reasonable to completely separate the finances of parties who have been married for such a long time. This could depend on other circumstances in the case as well.

For more information on whether your Agreement properly protects you with regards to the merger and survival clause you should consult with an Attorney. To consult with Kelsey & Trask, P.C. please call us at (508) 655-5980 or e-mail us.

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